Development Team

The Development Team is made up of the professionals who do the work of delivering the Product Increment. They self-organize to accomplish the work. Development Team members are expected to be available to the project full time.

Traditional software development approaches define various job types, such as architect, programmer, tester, database administrator, UI designer, and so on. Scrum defines the role of Development Team, which is simply a cross-functional collection of these types of people. The Development Team’s members, collectively, have the skills required to deliver the business value requested by the Product Owner. Whenever you can, you should create cross-functional teams. Parcelling the work out to different role-specific teams is suspect and is likely a serious impediment to the successful use of Scrum.

At the beginning of each Sprint, the Development Team participates in Sprint Planning. In collaboration with the Product Owner and with facilitation from the Scrum Master, the Development Team helps to establish the goal for the next sprint.

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Sprint Review

Near the end of the Sprint, the team conducts two important inspect-and-adapt activities: the Sprint Review and the Sprint Retrospective. The Sprint Review focuses on the product itself. The Sprint Retrospective, on the other hand, looks at the process the team is using to build the product.

During Sprint Planning we plan the work. During Sprint Execution we do the work. During Sprint Review we inspect (and adapt) the result of the work – the Potentially
Shippable Product Increment. The Sprint Review occurs near the end of each Sprint cycle, just after Sprint Execution and just before – or occasionally after – the Sprint Retrospective.

The Sprint Review gives everyone with input to the product development effort an opportunity to inspect and adapt what has been built so far. The Sprint Review provides a transparent look at the current state of the product, including any inconvenient truths. It is the time to ask questions, make observations or suggestions, and have discussions about how to best move forward given current realities.

Demonstrates what was achieved in the Sprint and collect feedback
Whole team participates
Invite anyone and everyone

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Sprinting

In Scrum, work is confined to a regular, repeatable work cycle, known as a Sprint or Iteration. Scrum Sprints are fixed intervals, ranging from one week to one month with preference to shorter periods. Working within the boundaries of such an accelerated time-frame, the team would only be able to build the most essential functionality.

A Release is typically composed of multiple Sprints, each of which delivers customer or user value. Every Sprint begins with Sprint Planning, a time when the Scrum Team gathers to agree on a Sprint Goal and determine what it can deliver during the forthcoming Sprint.

Sprint Execution accounts for the majority of time during a Sprint. It begins after Sprint Planning and ends when the Sprint Review starts. On a two-week-long Sprint, Sprint Execution might account for about eight out of the ten days.

Sprint Execution is the work the Scrum Team performs to meet the Sprint Goal. During the Sprint, the Development Team self-organizes to produce a Product Increment in accord with the Sprint Backlog, as determined during Sprint Planning. Self-organizing means that the team responsibly produces the Product Increment in accord with all the organization’s standards, according to the Definition of Done, and that the Development Team determines just how to go about that.

The Scrum Master participates as the coach, facilitator, and impediment remover, doing whatever is possible to help the team be successful. The Scrum Master doesn’t assign work to the team or tell the team how to do the work. A self-organizing team figures these things out for itself.

The Product Owner must be available during sprint execution to answer clarifying questions, to review intermediate work and provide feedback to the team, to discuss adjustments to the Sprint Goal if conditions warrant, and to verify that the acceptance criteria of Product Backlog Items have been met.

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